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Larry Hinders
Monday 21st April 2008, 11:00pm
Barkley Awarded Nobel Prize In a surprise ceremony in Stockholm, Sweden, Charles Barkley was awarded the Nobel Prize for Basketball Analysis for his landmark thesis entitled "The Washington Wizards: Morons of the Hardwood.” Early publicity surfaced concerning Barkley’s work just last week when Barkley declared that the Wizards were the dumbest team in the history of the NBA, but his study of the Wizards actually began three years ago when he ripped Washington in the early stages of their series against Chicago. Barkley noted at the time that the Wizards’ offense seemed to revolve around a pass-free scheme that hinged on randomly launched shots early in the shot clock. His work concluded recently when he became aware of the fact that DeShawn Stevenson had called Lebron James overrated. James has proceeded to outscore Stevenson 62 to 15 in two games in route to a 2 – 0 lead for the Cavs. The Wizards and Coach Eddie Jordan have succeeded in making Barkley look like a Rhodes Scholar instead of the comic relief on TNT’s “At the Half” show. Close scrutiny of Barkley thorough study reveals the following evidence of the Wizards’ low basketball IQ: 1. Eddie Jordan is supposed to be an offensive genius who is the master of the Princeton offense, a motion offense the features frequent passing and backdoor opportunities. The Wizards have managed, despite Jordan’s “brilliance,” to be one of the bottom five teams in the league in +/- assist ratio (meaning that comparing their number of assists to the number of assists they allow results is a low number). They rely on the offensive skills of their three All-Star caliber players while allowing other teams to efficiently run their offensive sets. 2. The Wizards allowed an NBA record for three point shots allowed in a season this year. If it had been points in the paint, you might think they simply didn’t have the size to defend. The fact is that Jordan believes you can only defend the interior or the perimeter and he has chosen the interior. His defensive scheme, if one really exists, allows other teams to get open looks at jump shots and results in career nights for opposing shooters. 3. The Wizards, despite having three strong players on the roster, were blown out by 20+ points ten times in the regular season. They also had a strong record against the leagues’ top teams. The inconsistency of the team’s performance speaks to an inability to stay focused on all types of opponents and results in consistent .500 (or so) records over the past four years. Jim Croce once said that “you don’t tug on Superman’s cape.” Apparently DeShawn Stevenson has never listened to “You Don’t Mess Around with Jim.” He challenged one of the leagues top players and his team has paid the price early in their current series. Jordan was quoted as saying that he doesn’t put any restrictions on his players’ comments. Perhaps a new, smarter approach should be employed by DeShawn and his player-friendly genius of a coach.
Larry Hinders
Monday 21st April 2008, 10:58pm
Barkley Awarded Nobel Prize In a surprise ceremony in Stockholm, Sweden, Charles Barkley was awarded the Nobel Prize for Basketball Analysis for his landmark thesis entitled "The Washington Wizards: Morons of the Hardwood.” Early publicity surfaced concerning Barkley’s work just last week when Barkley declared that the Wizards were the dumbest team in the history of the NBA, but his study of the Wizards actually began three years ago when he ripped Washington in the early stages of their series against Chicago. Barkley noted at the time that the Wizards’ offense seemed to revolve around a pass-free scheme that hinged on randomly launched shots early in the shot clock. His work concluded recently when he became aware of the fact that DeShawn Stevenson had called Lebron James overrated. James has proceeded to outscore Stevenson 62 to 15 in two games in route to a 2 – 0 lead for the Cavs. The Wizards and Coach Eddie Jordan have succeeded in making Barkley look like a Rhodes Scholar instead of the comic relief on TNT’s “At the Half” show. Close scrutiny of Barkley thorough study reveals the following evidence of the Wizards’ low basketball IQ: 1. Eddie Jordan is supposed to be an offensive genius who is the master of the Princeton offense, a motion offense the features frequent passing and backdoor opportunities. The Wizards have managed, despite Jordan’s “brilliance,” to be one of the bottom five teams in the league in +/- assist ratio (meaning that comparing their number of assists to the number of assists they allow results is a low number). They rely on the offensive skills of their three All-Star caliber players while allowing other teams to efficiently run their offensive sets. 2. The Wizards allowed an NBA record for three point shots allowed in a season this year. If it had been points in the paint, you might think they simply didn’t have the size to defend. The fact is that Jordan believes you can only defend the interior or the perimeter and he has chosen the interior. His defensive scheme, if one really exists, allows other teams to get open looks at jump shots and results in career nights for opposing shooters. 3. The Wizards, despite having three strong players on the roster, were blown out by 20+ points ten times in the regular season. They also had a strong record against the leagues’ top teams. The inconsistency of the team’s performance speaks to an inability to stay focused on all types of opponents and results in consistent .500 (or so) records over the past four years. Jim Croce once said that “you don’t tug on Superman’s cape.” Apparently DeShawn Stevenson has never listened to “You Don’t Mess Around with Jim.” He challenged one of the leagues top players and his team has paid the price early in their current series. Jordan was quoted as saying that he doesn’t put any restrictions on his players’ comments. Perhaps a new, smarter approach should be employed by DeShawn and his player-friendly genius of a coach.

Larry Hinders's Weblog Posts


Formula for Road Success Eludes the Wiz posted on 12/31/2010

When you are in the midst of a franchise-worst road losing streak, there are a few things a team must do to break out of its funk. The Wizards have one half of the game going in the right direction. Over the past few weeks, they have been holding their opponents under 100 points. It is at the offensive end that they have failed to heed the tried and true rules of NBA road success. Flip, guys, pay attention please. We’ll use today’s loss to the Pacers as a teachable moment.

Rule #1: Take quality shots

                                                  

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Five Reasons We Should Be Glad Gilbert Arenas Played for the Wiz posted on 12/31/2010

I side with those who believe that Gilbert’s move to sunny Orlando was in the best interest of the Wizards. His departure provides fans the opportunity to look back on the full impact of his time spent in the Nation’s Capital. Despite his hand in bringing our franchise to some of its lowest points ever, Gilbert’s overall impact on this team has been positive. Here’s why:

1.      A Lesson Learned

The Wizards invested a tremendous amount of money in Gilbert Arenas, a player they knew to be eccentric at best. When things went sour, the franchise was handcuffed because his contract was next to impossible to unload. Both Ted Leonsis and Ernie Grunfeld are bright guys. I have to believe that the Wizards will be reluctant to mortgage the team’s future to sign a player who is anything but a solid and dependable person.

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Results are in from Wizards' Blatche Experiment posted on 12/30/2010

     The findings from the Washington Institute for Advance Roundball Research’s half-decade long Andray Blatche experiment are in; conclusive evidence indicates he is not worth the continued investment of time or money by the Wizards franchise. Blatche is nearly impossible for an NBA GM to resist. He puts up pretty solid numbers, has length and decent agility, and he is young despite having spent five years as a professional basketball player. Only close observation over a long period of time can reveal that his minuses outweigh his pluses.

     Blatche’s biggest problem is that he seems incapable of growing up. Each of the last two seasons the Wizards have sold Blatche as a young man who is ready to step up and assume a leadership role on the team. Instead the team has been fed a steady diet of immature behavior and selfish antics. Consider his history:

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